M.Tech 1st Semester Aerospace Propulsion Technology Syllabus

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MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY
Sub Code : 14 MAP153

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs/week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 100

Unit-I
Management of Technological Innovation: Importance, new growth theory, general issues to be managed, changing nature of industry, business and innovation systems and networks, changing nature of management-innovation process, globalization. Management of Research and Development: What is Research and Development, Centralized and decentralized Research and Development, managing research teams, balancing research portfolios, managing international Research and Development.
10 Hours

Unit-II
Management of New Product Development: New product, innovative new product development, development of new services, flexibility in design, innovation across the board.
Management of Operation and Production: Techniques of operation and production management, lean production, automation, investment appraisal techniques, role of engineers in industry, internal and external integration of operation and production, manufacturing strategy.
10 Hours

Unit-III
Technology Strategy : Strategic management issue, technology strategy, technological competencies, balancing investments in resources and innovative capabilities, learning and technology strategy, technology strategies in small and medium sized enterprise.
Technological Collaboration: Extent of technological collaboration, Challenges of managing, organizational learning and technological collaboration, trust and technological collaboration, international technological collaboration.
10 Hours

Unit-IV
Commercialization Process: Introduction to commercialization process, marketing technology products, industrial intellectual property rights, licensing, technology pricing, technical standards, and technology transfer.
10 Hours

Unit-V
Future Challenges for Management of Technological Innovation: Five future challenges for management of technological innovation- managing technology based competition in the knowledge economy, managing the new innovation process, managing relationship with government, managing global science and technology.
10 Hours

Text Books:
1. Mark Dodgson, “The management of technological innovation: An international and strategic approach”, Oxford university press, New York, 2002
2. Ravinder Kumar Jain, Harry Charalambos Triandis, “Management of research and development organizations: managing the unmanageable” John Wiley and sons, Inc, Canada, 1997

Reference Books:
1. Ravi Jain, Harry C. Triandis, Cynthia W. Weick, “Managing Research, Development and Innovation: Managing the Unmanageable” John Wiley and sons, Inc, New York, 2010
2. Thomas W. Jackson, Jack Marion Spurlock, “Research and development management” Dow Jones-Irwin, University of Minnesota, 2009
3. Paul Lowe, “The management of technology: perception and opportunities” Champman and Hall,1995
4. Khalil, “Management Of Technology” Tat McGraw-Hill-2009

Applied Mathematics
Sub Code : 14MAP11

IA Marks : 50
Hrs/week : 04 Exam Hours : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 100
Practical/Field work/Assignment hrs per week : 02 First Semester: 18 Weeks

Same as Subject Code: 14 MAE11 – Refer This

MEASUREMENTS, INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROLS
Sub Code : 14 MAP13

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs/week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 100

Unit-I
Motion – Force – Torque – Power – Pressure Measurements: Relative and absolute motion measurement. Force measurement- balance, hydraulic and pneumatic load cell, elastic force device. Torque and Power measurement- transmission, driving, absorption dynamometers. Pressure measurement- Low, moderate and high pressure measurement. Temperature – Flow- Acoustics measurement: Temperature measurement – non electrical, electrical, radiation method. Flow measurementprimary, positive displacement, secondary or rate meter. Acoustics measurement- characteristics of sound, sound pressure, power and intensity levels, loudness, typical sound measuring systems, microphones.
10 Hours

Unit-II
Instrumentation and their Representation: Introduction, functional elements of a measurement system, classification of instruments, microprocessor based instrumentation, standard and calibration. Static and Dynamic characteristic of instruments – error and uncertainties in performance parameters, propagation of uncertainties in compound quantities, static performance parameter, impedance loading and matching, specification and selection of instrument. Dynamic characteristics – formulation of system equation, dynamic response, compensation.
10 Hours

Unit-III
Transducer, Intermediate, Indicating, Recording and Display Elements: Transducer elements–analog and digital transducers. Intermediate elements – amplifiers, differentiating and integrating elements, filters, A-D and D-A converters, terminology and conversions, data transmission elements. Digital voltmeter, cathode ray oscilloscopes, galvanometric recorder, servo type potentiometric recorders, magnetic tape recorders, digital recorder of memory type, data acquisition systems, data displace and storage.
10 Hours

Unit-IV
Introduction to Automatic Controls: Introduction, closed loop and open loop control systems, mathematical modeling of mechanical, electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, Types of control actions. State-Space Methods – Introduction, Vector matrix representation of State-Space equations, State Transition Matrix and equations, Characteristics equations, Controllability and observeability of control systems: General concept of controlability, definition of state controllability, alternate tests on controlability, Definition of observability, alternate tests on observability, relationship among controllability, observability and transfer functions.
10 Hours

Unit-V
Design of control systems in state space: Pole placement, Design of servo systems, state observers, design of regulator systems with observers, design of control systems with observers, quadratic optimal regulator systems.
Design of discrete data control systems: Digital implementation of analog controllers, digital controllers, design in frequency domain and z plane.
10 Hours

Text Books:
1. Nakra and Chaudhry, B C Nakra K K Chaudhry, “Instrumentation, Measurement and Analysis” Tata McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc, New York, Seventh Edition 2006.
2. R. S. Sirohi, H. C. Radha Krishna, “Mechanical measurements” New Age International Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2004.

Reference:
1. B.C. Kuo, “Automatic Control Systems” Prentice Hall Inc.
2. K. Ogata, “Modern Control Engineering” Prentice Hall Inc
3. Arun K. Ghosh, “Introduction to Measurements and Instrumentation”, Prentice-Hall of India Ltd, New Delhi, 2nd Edition 2007.
4. Harrison & Bollinger, “Automatic Control Systems” International Text Book Company.
5. Francis H. Raven, “Automatic Control Engineering”, McGraw- Hill International

HEAT TRANSFER IN PROPULSION SYSTEMS
Sub Code : 14 MAP14

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs/week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 100

Unit-I
Fundamentals: Conduction, Convection, Radiation, Concept of boundary layers – velocity / thermal. Need for turbine blade cooling, turbine cooling technology, turbine heat transfer and cooling issues. Turbine-Stage Heat Transfer: Introduction, Real engine turbine stage, simulated turbine stage, time-resolved heat-transfer measurement on a rotor blade. Cascade blade heat transfer. Airfoil end wall heat transfer. Turbine rotor blade tip heat transfer. Leading edge region heat transfer. Flat surface heat transfer.
10 Hours

Unit-II
Turbine Film Cooling: Fundamentals of film cooling. Film cooling on rotating turbine blades. Film cooling on cascade vane simulations, Film cooling on cascade blade simulations, Film cooling on airfoil endwalls. Turbine blade tip film cooling. Leading edge region film cooling. Flat surface film cooling. Film cooling effectiveness. Discharge coefficient of turbine cooling holes. Film cooling effect on aerodynamic losses.
Jet Impingement Cooling: Heat transfer enhancement by a single jet, Impingement heat transfer in the mid-chord region by jet array, Impingement cooling of leading edge.
10 Hours

Unit-III
Rib Turbulated Cooling: Effect of rib layouts and flow parameters on ribbed channel heat transfer, heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlation, high performance ribs, effect of surface heating conditions, nonrectangular cross section channels, effect of high blockage ratio ribs, effect of rib profile effect of number of ribbed walls, effect of a 180o sharp turn, detailed heat transfer coefficient measurements in ribbed channel, effect of film cooling hole on ribbed channel heat transfer.
10 Hours

Unit-IV
Pin Fin Cooling: Flow and heat transfer analysis with single pin, pin array and correlation, effect of pin shape on heat transfer, effect of nonuniform array and flow convergence, effect of skewed pin array, partial pin arrangements, effect of turning flow, pin fin cooling with ejection, effect of missing pin on heat transfer coefficient.
Temperature Measurement Techniques: Infra red thermography, Thermocouples, Heat flux gauges, Liquid crystal thermography, Temperature sensitive paints. Engine Temperature and Health Monitoring- Thermal barrier coatings, Engine temperature monitoring, Engine safety and health monitoring
10 Hours

Unit-V
Compound and new cooling techniques: Impingement on ribbed walls, impingement on pinned and dimpled walls, combined effect of ribbed wall with grooves, combined effect of ribbed walls with pins and impingement inlet conditions, combined effect of swirl flow and ribs, impingement heat transfer with perforated baffles, combined effect of swirl and impingement. Concept of heat pipe for turbine cooling, new cooling concepts.
10 Hours

Text Books:
1. Technology Je Chin Han, Sandip Dutta & Srinath V Ekkad. Taylor and Francis, “Gas Turbine Heat Transfer and Cooling”, New York- 2000
2. JP Holman, “Heat Transfer”, McGraw – Hill Book Company

References:
1. Anthony Giampaolo, “Gas Turbine Handbook”,
2. NAL, Bangalore, “Engine health monitoring as applied to gas turbine engines”, 1983
3. Eckert, E R G and Goldstern R J Ed., “Measurement techniques in heat transfer” ,
4. Hill P., and Peterson, C., “Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Propulsion”, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 2nd Edition, 1992.

FINITE ELEMENT METHODS
Sub Code : 14 MAP151

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs/week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 100

Unit-I
Introduction to Finite Element Method: Basic Steps in Finite Element Method to solve mechanical engineering (Solid, Fluid and Heat Transfer) problems: Functional approach and Galerkin approach.
Displacement Approach: Admissible Functions, Convergence Criteria: Conforming and Non Conforming elements, Co C1 and Cn Continuity Elements. Basic Equations, Element Characteristic Equations, Assembly Procedure, Boundary and Constraint Conditions.
10 Hours

Unit-II
Solid Mechanics I : One-Dimensional Finite Element Formulations and Analysis – Bars- uniform, varying and stepped cross section- Basic(Linear) and Higher Order Elements Formulations for Axial, Torsional and Temperature Loads with problems. Beams- Basic (Linear) Element Formulation-for uniform, varying and stepped cross section- for different loading and boundary conditions with problems.
10 Hours

Unit-III
One-Dimensional Finite Element Formulations in Two and Three Dimension: Trusses, Plane Frames and Space Frame Basic (Linear) Elements Formulations for different boundary condition -Axial, Bending, Torsional, and Temperature Loads with problems.
Two Dimensional Finite Element Formulations for Solid Mechanics Problems: Triangular Membrane (TRIA 3, TRIA 6, TRIA 10) Element, Four- Noded Quadrilateral Membrane (QUAD 4, QUAD 8) Element Formulations for in-plane loading with sample problems. Triangular and Quadrilateral Axi-symmetric basic and higher order Elements formulation for axi-symmetric loading only with sample problems
10 Hours

Unit-IV
Three Dimensional Finite Element Formulations for Solid Mechanics Problems: Finite Element Formulation of Tetrahedral Element (TET 4, TET 10), Hexahedral Element (HEXA 8, HEXA 20), for different loading conditions. Serendipity and Lagrange family Elements.
Finite Element Formulations for Structural Mechanics Problems: Basics of plates and shell theories: Classical thin plate Theory, Shear deformation Theory and Thick Plate theory. Finite Element Formulations for triangular and quadrilateral Plate elements. Finite element formulation of flat, curved, cylindrical and conical Shell elements.
10 Hours

Unit-V
Dynamic Analysis: Finite Element Formulation for point/lumped mass and distributed masses system, Finite Element Formulation of one dimensional dynamic analysis: bar, truss, frame and beam element. Evaluation of eigen values and eigen vectors applicable to bars, shaft, beams, plane and space frame
10 Hours

Text Books:
1. Chandrupatla T. R, “Finite Elements in Engineering”, 2nd Edition, PHI, 2007.
2. Lakshminarayana H. V., “Finite Elements Analysis – Procedures in Engineering,” Universities Press,

Reference Books:
1. Rao S. S., “Finite Elements Method in Engineering,” 4th Edition, Elsevier, 2006
2. P.Seshu, “Textbook of Finite Element Analysis” PHI, 2004.
3. J.N.Reddy, “Finite Element Method”, McGraw -Hill International Edition.
4. Cook R. D., et al., “Concepts and Application of Finite Elements Analysis”, 4th Edition, Wiley & Sons, 2003.
5. Daryl L Logan, “A first course in Finite Element Method”, Thomson, Third Edition
6. Hutton. “Fundamentals of FEM”, McGraw –Hill, 2004

CONTINUUM MECHANICS
Sub Code : 14 MAP152

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs/week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 100

Unit-I
Analysis of Stress: Continuum concept, homogeneity, isotropy, mass density, body force, surface force Cauchy’s stress principle-stress vector, State of stress at a point- stress tensor, stress tensor –stress vector relationship, Force and moment, equilibrium, stress tensor symmetry. Stress transformation laws, stress quadric of Cauchy. Principal stresses, Stress invariants, stress ellipsoid, maximum and minimum shear stress, Mohr’s circle for stress, plane stress, deviator and spherical stress tensors.
10 Hours

Unit-II
Deformation and Strain: Particles and points, continuum configuration-deformation and flow concepts. Position vector, displacement vector- Lagrangian and Eulerian description, deformation gradient, displacement gradient. Deformation tensors, finite strain tensors,small deformation theory, infinitesimal strain tensors. Relative displacement- linear, rotation tensors. Transformation properties of strain tensors. Principal strains, strain invariants, cubical dilatation, spherical and deviator strain tensors, plane strain, Mohr’s circle, and compatibility equations.
Motion and Flow: Motion, flow, material derivative. Velocity, acceleration, instantaneous velocity field. Path line, stream line, steady motion. Rate of deformation, Vorticity, natural strain –physical interpretation. Material derivatives of volume, area and line element, material derivatives of volume, surface and line integrals.
10 Hours

Unit-III
Fundamental Laws of Continuum Mechanics: Conservation of mass, continuity equation. Linear momentum principle, equation of motion, equilibrium equations. Moment of momentum principle. Conservation of energy- first law of thermodynamics energy equation. Equation of state, entropy, second law of thermodynamics. Clausius-Duhem inequality, dissipation function. Constitutive equations-thermomechanical and mechanical continua.
Linear Elasticity: Generalized Hooke’s law, Strain energy function, isotropy, anisotropy, elastic symmetry. Isotropic media-elastic constants. Elastostatic and Elastodynamic problems. Theorem of superposition, uniqueness of solutions, St. Venant’s principle. Two dimensional elasticity- plane stress, plane strain, Airy’s stress function. Two dimensional elastostatic problems in polar coordinates. Hyperelasticity, Hypoelasticity, linear thermoelasticity.
10 Hours

Unit-IV
Fluids: Fluid pressure, viscous stress tensor, barotropic flow. Constitutive equations-Stokesian, Newtonian fluids. Basic equation for Newtonian fluid, Nevier-Strokes-Duhum equations. Steady flow, hydrostatic, irrotational flow. Perfect fluids- Bernoulli’s equation, circulation, potential flow, plane potential flow.
10 Hours

Unit-V
Plasticity: Basic concept and definitions, idealized plastic behavior. Yield condition- Tresca and Von-Mises criteria. Stress space--plane, yield surface. Post yield behavior-isotropic and kinematic hardening. Plastic stress-strain equations, plastic potential theory. Equivalent stress, equivalent plastic strain increment. Plastic work, strain hardening hypothesis. Total deformation theory-elastoplastic problems. Elementary slip line theory for plane plastic strain
Viscoelasticity: Linear viscoelastic behavior. Simple viscoelastic models-generalized models, linear differential operator equation. Creep and Relaxation- creep function, relaxation function, hereditary integrals. Complex moduli and compliances. Three dimensional theory- viscoelastic stress analysis, correspondence principles.
10 Hours

Text Books:
1. J. N. Reddy, “Introduction to Continuum Mechanics with Applications”, Cambridge University Press, New York-2008
2. W. Michael Lai, David Rubin, Erhard Krempl “Introduction to Continuum Mechanics”, Fourth edition, 2010, Butterworth-Heinemann -Elsevier Inc. USA

References:
1. George. E. Mase, “Continuum Mechanics”, Schaum’s outline series, ‘McGraw Hill Book Company inc, USA.
2. Batra, R. C. “Elements of Continuum Mechanics” , (2006) Reston, VA: AIAA.
3. Mase, George E, “Continuum Mechanics”, (1970), McGraw-Hill Professional
4. Dill, Ellis Harold, “Continuum Mechanics: Elasticity, Plasticity, Viscoelasticity”, Germany: CRC Press, (2006).
5. Fung, Y. C, “A First Course in Continuum Mechanics”, (2nd edition), Prentice-Hall, Inc.. (1977).
6. Gurtin, M. E, “An Introduction to Continuum Mechanics”, New York: Academic Press, (1981).
7. Mase, G. Thomas, George E. Mase, “Continuum Mechanics for Engineers”, (Second Edition), CRC Press, (1999).

AEROSPACE PROPULSION
Sub Code : 14 MAP12

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs/week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 100

Unit-I
Introduction to Propulsive Devices and Gas Turbine Engines: Atmospheric Properties. Turbojet, Turbofan, Turboprop, Turbo-shaft Engine Construction and Nomenclature, theory and performance, introduction to compressors, turbines, combustors and after burners for aircraft engines.
10 Hours

Unit-II
Gas Turbine Engine Fuel and Fuel Systems: Fuel specification, fuel properties, liquid fuel handling and treatment, heavy fuels, fuel gas handling and treatment, equipment for removal of particulate and liquids from fuel gas systems, fuel heating, cleaning of turbine components, fuel economics, operating experience, heat tracing of piping systems. Types of heat tracing systems, storage of liquids.
10 Hours

Unit-III
Engine Performance and Health Monitoring: Performance and Matching of modules of gas turbines-turbomachine aerothermodynamics, aerothermal equations, efficiencies, dimensional analysis, compressor performance characteristic, turbine performance characteristics, Engine health monitoring techniques.
10 Hours

Unit-IV
Engine Air Frame Integration: Engine Performance theory, Propeller theory – pusher and tractor mode. Thrust vectoring nozzles. Introduction to Rocket Propulsion and Space Mission, Classification and fundamentals. Fuels and propellants. Rocket combustion processes. Introduction to Space mission. Fuel cells for space mission.
10 Hours

Unit-V
Solid Propellant Rocket Description: Performance Estimation, Flame spread and Ignition transient. Mechanical characterization of propellants. Grain design. Burn rate estimation.
Liquid Propellant Rocket Description: Performance estimation. Injectors. Cooling systems. Combustion instabilities.
Hybrid Propellant Rocket Description: Performance estimation, Mission requirements and Power plant selection. Cryogenic engines. Ramjet and Scramjet engines.
10 Hours

Text Books:
1. Dennis G Shepherd, “Aerospace Propulsion” American Elsovier Publishing Co Inc NY.
2. George P Sutton and Donald M Ross, “Rocket Propulsion Elements”, John Wiley & Sons NY.

Reference Books:
1. Michael J Kroes and Thomas W Wild, “Aircraft power plants”, Macmillan/McGraw Hill NY.
2. E. Irwin Treager, “Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Technology”, 3rd Edition, 1995, ‘ISBN-002018281
3. Hill, P.G. , Peterson, C.R. Addison , “Mechanics & Thermodynamics of Propulsion”, Wesley Longman INC, 1999.
4. Huzel and Houng, “Design of Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines’, NASA SP 125, 1971.
5. Barrere et al., “Rocket Propulsion”, Elsevier Co., 1960
6. Williams F A. et al., “Fundamental Aspects of Solid Propellant Rockets”, Agardograph, 116 Technivision, 1970.
7. Meherwan P. Boyce, “Gas turbine engineering handbook”, Gulf professional publisher, Elsevier, 2006

PROPULSION LAB
Sub Code : 14 MAPL16

IA Marks : 25
No. of Lecture Hrs/week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Total Lecture Hrs : 50 Exam Marks : 50

List of Experiments

1. Cascade testing of a model of turbine blade row and study of wake survey.
2. Estimation of propeller performance
3. Forced Convective heat transfer on a flat surface
4. Measurement of Burning Velocity of a Premixed Flame
5. Determination of heat of combustion of aviation fuels
6. Fuel – injection characteristics (spray cone geometry; spray speed etc. for various type of injectors)
7. Measurement of an static overall pressure rise & rotor static pressure rise & fan overall efficiency through axial flow fan unit
8. Investigation of relationship between flame speed and air-fuel ratio for a slow burning gaseous fuel.
9. Construction of flame stability diagram through flame propagation & stability unit
10. Measurement of Ram Jet Engine characteristics (thrust, static and total pressures, temperatures, exhaust velocity & fuel consumption)
11. Measurement of PulseJet Engine characteristics (thrust, static and total pressures, temperatures, exhaust velocity & fuel consumption)
12. Study of Jet Engine characteristics (thrust, static and total pressures, temperatures, exhaust velocity & fuel consumption)

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