M. Tech Bio Technology 1st Sem Syllabus

Download M. Tech Bio Technology 1st Sem Syllabus [PDF]

NUMERICAL METHODS & BIOSTATISTICS
Subject Code : 14BBT11

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 50 Exam Marks : 100

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Enable students to address the relevance of probability and statistics to advanced engineering problems in biotechnology including modeling of complex systems.

MODULE 1: 10 HOURS
Introduction to statistics and study design: Introduction to statistics, data, variables, types of data, tabular, graphical and pictorial representation of data. Significance of statistics to biological problems, experimental studies; randomized controlled studies, historically controlled studies, cross over, factorial design, cluster design, randomized; complete, block, stratified design, biases, analysis and interpretation.

MODULE 2: 10 HOURS
Descriptive statistics and Observational study design: Types of variables, measure of spread, logarithmic transformations, multivariate data.
Basics of study design, cohort studies, case-control studies, outcomes, odd ratio and relative risks.
Principles of statistical inference: Parameter estimation, hypothesis testing. Statistical inference on categorical variables; categorical data, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sample size estimation

MODULE 3: 10 HOURS
Comparison of means: Test statistics; t-test, F distribution, independent and dependent sample comparison, Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Test, ANOVA.
Correlation and simple linear regression: Introduction, Karl Pearson correlation coefficient, Spearman Rank correlation coefficient, simple linear regression, regression model fit, inferences from the regression model, ANOVA tables for regression.
Multiple linear regression and linear models: Introduction, Multiple linear regression model, ANOVA table for multiple linear regression model, assessing model fit, polynomials and interactions. One-way and Two-way ANOVA tables, F-tests. Algorithm and implementation using numerical methods with case studies.

MODULE 4: 10 HOURS
Design and analysis of experiments: Random block design, multiple sources of variation, correlated data and random effects regression, model fitting. Completely randomized design, stratified design. Biological study designs. Optimization strategies with case studies.

MODULE 5: 10 HOURS
Statistics in microarray, genome mapping and bioinformatics: Types of microarray, objectives of the study, experimental designs for micro array studies, microarray analysis, interpretation, validation and microarray informatics. Genome mapping, discrete sequence matching, programs for mapping sequences with case studies.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, students are able to analyze and organize data graphically and numerically, Interpret and conclude the statistical problems.

TEXT BOOKS:
1. Alvin E. Lewis, Biostatistics, McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing, 2013
2. J.D. Lee and T.D. Lee. Statistics and Numerical Methods in BASIC for Biologists, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1982.
3. T.P. Chapman, Statistical Analysis of Gene Expression Microarray Data, CRC, 2003.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Wolfgang Boehm and Hartmut Prautzsch, Numerical Methods, CRC Press, 1993.
2. John F. Monahan. Numerical Methods of Statistics (Cambridge Series in Statistical and Probabilistic Mathematics), Cambridge University Press, 2011.
3. Joe D. Hoffman. Numerical Methods for Engineers and Scientists, CRC Press, 2nd Edition, 2001.
4. Warren J. Ewens Gregory Grant, Statistical Methods in Bioinformatics: An Introduction (Statistics for Biology and Health), Springer, 2005.

GENOMICS, PROTEOMICS AND MICROARRAY
Subject Code : 14BBT153

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 50 Exam Marks : 100

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Explain the molecular aspects of genome and proteome
Correlate the markers for various biotechnological purposes
To know the technology of microarray and protein array along with its application in the fields of medicine, agriculture and environment.

MODULE 1: 10 Hours
Introduction: Genomics and Proteomics. Structure, organization and features of Prokaryotic & Eukaryotic Genomes. Vectors, Genome mapping. Polymorphisms: Molecular markers – RFLP, AFLP, RAPD, SCAR, SNP, ISSR, and Protein markers – Allozymes and Isozymes, Telomerase, FISH – DNA amplification markers and Cancer biomarkers. Genome sequences databases and Genome annotation, Gene discovery. Gene Ontology. Haplotyping and Diplotyping. Genome Sequencing: Early sequencing efforts. DNA sequencing methods – Maxam-Gilbert Method, Sanger Dideoxy method, Fluorescence method, shot-gun approach and ultra-highthroughput DNA Sequencing using Microarray technology. Genome sequencing projects on E.coli. Arabidopsis and rice; Humangenome project and the genetic map. Recent developments and next generation sequencing. Raw genome sequence data, expressed sequenced tags (ESTs), Gene variation and associated diseases, diagnostic genes and drug targets. Genotyping – DNA Chips, diagnostic assays, diagnostic services. Comparative genomics and Functional Genomics. Studies with model systems such as Yeast, Drosophila, C. elegans, Arabidopsis. SAGE.

MODULE 2: 10 Hours
Functional Genomics: C-Values of eukaryotic genomes. Organization of microbial, plant and animal genomes, repetitive and coding sequences. Identification and tagging of markers for important traits, T-DNA & trasposon tagging. Cloning of genes by map-based cloning, Construction & Screening of cDNAs libraries, differential display via RT-PCR. Micro-array in functionalgenomics. Genome annotation: Extrinsic, Intrinsic (Signals and Content), Conservative information used in gene prediction. Frameworks for Information integration – Exon chaining, Generative models: Hidden Morkov Models, Discriminative learning and Combiners. Evaluation of Gene prediction methods – Basic tools, Systematic evaluation and Community experiments (GASP, EGASP and NGASP).

MODULE 3: 10 Hours
Proteomics: Scope, Experimental methods for studying proteomics, methods of protein isolation, purification and quantification.
Methods for large scale synthesis of proteins. Applications of peptides in biology. Analysis of proteins – high throughput screening, engineering novel proteins, Mass-Spectroscopy based protein expression and post-translational modification analysis. Bioinformatics analysis – clustering methods, proteome functional information.

MODULE 4: 10 Hours
Functional annotation of Proteins: Introduction, Protein sequence databases, UniProt, UniProtKB – Sequence curation, Sequence annotation, Functional annotation, annotation of protein structure, post-translational modification, protein-protein interactions and pathways, annotation of human sequences and diseases in UniProt and UniProtKB. Protein family classification for functional annotation – Protein signature methods and Databases, InterPro, InterProScan for sequence classification and functional annotation. Annotation from Genes and Protein to Genome and Proteome. Microarray: Basics of Biochips and Microarray Technology, Historical Development, Biochip technologies.

MODULE 5: 10 Hours
Applications Of Biochip Technology: Molecular diagnostics, Pharmacogenomics, application of microarray technology in drug discovery and development, Gene expression studies, Use of DNA chip technology for drug safety, Use of microchips for drug delivery, Use of biochips in healthcare, Use of microarrays in population genetics and epidemiology, Use of microarrays in forensics, DNA chip technology for water quality management, Application of micro arrays in the agro-industry; use of microarrays in Genetic disease monitoring; Point of Care (P.O.C) applications, Limitations of biochip technology. Commercial Aspects of Biochip
Technology: Markets for biochip technologies, Commercial support for the development of biochips, Government support for biochip development, Business strategies, and Patent issues. DNA computing.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, students are able to demonstrate the construction concepts of various genome map, acquire the method involved in analysis of proteins, use the tools and techniques for microarray, data analysis in disease diagnosis.

TEXT BOOKS:
1. Bioinformatics, Genomics, and Proteomics By Ann Batiza, Ann Finney Batiza, Published by Chelsea House Publishers, 2005.
2. Biochips and Microarays – Technology and Commercial Potential Published by: Informa Global Pharmaceuticals and Health Care.
3. A. Malcolm Campbell, Laurie J. Heyer, Discovering genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics.Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 2006.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
4. Grigorenko. E.V. DNA Arrays: Technology and Experimental Strategies CRC Press. 2002.
5. Mark Schena, Microarray Analysis. John Wiley & Sons. 2002.
6. Pharmacogenomics. Werner Kalow, Urs A. Meyer, Rachel F. Tyndale.
7. Sandor Suhai, Genomics and Proteomics, Springer publishing.

PRINCIPLES OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Subject Code : 14BBT13

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 50 Exam Marks : 100

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Analyze and apply chemical and biochemical systems, their principles using thermodynamic fundamentals.
Perform feasibility studies on chemical engineering processes along with fluid flow system and mechanical operation
Acquire knowledge for heat and mass transfer systems employed in industrial processes.

MODULE 1: 10 Hours
Energy and Material Balances: Material Balance: Law conservation of mass, Material balance with and without reactions. Energy Balance: Law of conversation of energy, Energy balance with and without chemical reactions.
Introduction to Momentum Transfer: Types of fluids: Newtonian and Non Newtonian fluids. Measurement of viscosity, Laminar and Turbulent flow, eddy viscosity, flow of a fluid past a solid surface (Cells and immobilized systems), motion of particles in fluid (centrifugation & sedimentation), flow of fluid through granular bed (packed column), fluidization, and bubble column.

MODULE 2: 10 Hours
Heat Transfer: Thermal conductivity and mechanism of energy transport, design principles of heat exchangers, measurement of heat transfer coefficient, principles, construction and application of evaporators and dryers.
Mass transfer: Diffusion, interfacial diffusion (Mass transfer), convective mass transfer, measurement of mass transfer coefficient, Mass transfer process (Principle, construction and application of Distillation, adsorption, extraction and crystallization).

MODULE 3: 10 Hours
Thermodynamics: First and Second law of thermodynamics, application of first and second law in Biomolecular structure, PVT behaviour, PVT diagram of pure fluids, thermodynamics models used in process industries( Peng-Robinson model, EOS, NRTL,SRK etc). Chemical potential and activity of molecules, statistical thermodynamics, Bioenergetics: Energetic of metabolic pathways, energy coupling, thermodynamic efficiency of growth and yield co-efficients.

MODULE 4: 10 Hours
Reaction Engineering: Kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, kinetics of microbial growth, substrate utilization and product formation. Batch and continuous reactors, energy and mass balance in biological reactions. Heterogeneous reaction: Shell balance (Immobilized system), effect of mass transfer on reaction, Thiele modulus, solid liquid mass transfer correlations, minimizing mass transfer effects.

MODULE 5: 10 Hours
Properties of solution, phase equilibrium. Diffusion, its types, measurement of diffusivities, theoretical estimation of diffusitivities, Drying; moisture content and its types, wet and dry moisture contents, drying curve, drying equipments, RTD curves-its interpretation, RTD for CSTR and PFR; calculations.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, students are able to derive and calculate thermodynamic relations using energy equations, analyze fluid flow in pipes and mechanical operations, design transfer processes and equipments.

TEXT BOOKS:
1. Bhatt B. I and S.M. Vora Stoichiometry Tata McGraw Hill, 4th Edition, 2004.
2. McCAbe RL & J.C Smith “Unit operations of Chemical Engineering” McGraw Hill International Editions, 2001.
3. R. K. Bansal, Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics of Machines, Laxmi Publications, New Delhi, 4th ed. 2005.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
4. O. Levenspiel, Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Edition, John Wiley, 1999.
5. Bailey J.E. and Ollis D.F. Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals 2nd Edition, McGraw- Hill Book CO., Singapore, (1986).
6. Michael Shuler and Fikret Kargi, Bioprocess Engineering: Basic Concepts, 2nd Edition, PHI, 2002.
7. Pauline Doran, Bioprocess Engineering Principles, 1st Edition, Academic Press, 1995.

BIOMOLECULES AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
Subject Code : 14BBT14

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 50 Exam Marks : 100

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Portray the properties and metabolism associated with biomolecules Enlighten on transcription, translation, and regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes

MODULE 1: 10 Hours
Introduction to Macromolecules: Biomolecules; Nucleic acids: storage and transfer of genetic information; Carbohydrates: energy transactions and structural blocks Proteins: structure, folding and catalysis; Lipids: membranes and energy transactions; Nucleic Acids: Structure of DNA, Alternative forms of DNA – A, B, Z and triplex DNA. Melting Curve of DNA double helix, Hyperchromoic effect and factors responsible for DNA double helical structure, Structure of RNA and Structural aspects of mRNA, tRNA and rRNA. Composition and primary structure of proteins; Conformational analysis and forces that determine protein structures and geometries; potential energy calculations, phi, psi, omega angles, Ramachandran or steric contour diagram, chi angles of side chains in proteins; hydrogen bonding; disulphide bonds; hydrophobic interactions; alpha helices; beta sheets; helix to coil transition, general features and thermodynamic aspects of protein folding and folding kinetics, protein-ligand interactions.

MODULE 2: 10 Hours
Replication, Repair and Recombination: Mode of DNA Replication, basic Requirements for DNA Synthesis, Steps involved in DNA synthesis, Origin of replication in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, Replication initiation, elongation and termination in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; Repliosome and Replication Fork, Enzymes and accessory proteins; Fidelity; Replication of single stranded circular DNA – Mitochondrial and Chloroplast DNA. DNA damage and DNA repair, DNA repair mechanisms – Photoreactivation; Nucleotide excision repair; Mismatch correction; Post replication repair and SOS repair; Recombination: Homologous and non-homologous; Site specific recombination

MODULE 3: 10 Hours
Basic features of RNA synthesis and Steps involved in Transcription, Prokaryotic & Eukaryotic RNA Polymerases, Prokaryotic Transcription and regulation; Transcription unit, Promoters and Transcription process, Initiation; Attenuation; Termination: Rhodependent and independent; Antitermination. Transcriptional control in lambda phage; Eukaryotic transcription and regulation; RNA polymerase structure and assembly; RNA polymerase I, II, III; Eukaryotic promoters and enhancers; General Transcription factors; TATA box binding protein (TBP) and TBP associated factors (TAF); Activators and repressors; Transcript processing; Processing of tRNA and rRNA,

MODULE 4: 10 Hours
Gene regulation and Operon concept, Constitutive, Inducible and Repressible systems; Operators and Regulatory elements; Positive and negative regulation of operon; lac, trp, ara, his, and gal operons and their regulation; Transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Processing of hnRNA, tRNA, rRNA; 5′-Cap formation; 3′-end processing and polyadenylation; Splicing; RNA editing; Nuclear export of mRNA; mRNA stability; Catalytic RNA. ; Chi sequences in prokaryotes; Gene targeting; Gene disruption; FLP/FRT and Cre/ Lox recombination.

MODULE 5: 10 Hours
Translation and Protein targeting; Requirements for protein biosynthesis, Steps involved in protein biosynthesis, Ribosomes; Composition and assembly; Genetic code; Evolutio of Triplet concept, Properties of genetic code. tRNA and its role in translation; Wobble hypothesis; Mechanism of initiation, elongation and termination; Co- and post-translational modifications; Genetic codon variation in mitochondria; Transport of proteins and molecular chaperones; Protein stability; Protein turnover and degradation.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, students are able to obtain a profound foundation in fundamental of biochemical concepts.
Explain the expression, regulation, manipulation, of genes and genetic manipulation techniques in the living cells at transcriptional and post transcriptional level.

TEXT BOOKS:
1. Benjamin Lewin, Gene IX, 9th Edition, Jones and Barlett Publishers, 2007.
2. J.D. Watson, N.H. Hopkins, J.W Roberts, J. A. Seitz & A.M. Weiner; Molecular Biology of the Gene, 6th Edition, Benjamin Cummings Publishing Company Inc, 2007.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
3. Charles R. Cantor, Paul R. Schimmel, Biophysical Chemistry. W.H.Freeman, 1980.
4. G P Jeyanthi, Molecular Biology, MJP Publishers Chennai 2009.
5. By Veer bal Rastogi, Fundamentals of Molecular biology, Ane’s Publication New Delhi 2011 .

ENZYME TECHNOLOGY
Subject Code : 14BBT151

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 50 Exam Marks : 100

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Conceptualize for product separation techniques from biological source and their utility in various industries.
Principles and techniques involved in kinetics and immobilization of enzymes.

MODULE 1: 10 Hours
Introduction, current and potential uses of enzyme technology. Enzymes as biocatalysts: advantages and disadvantages over chemical catalysts and characteristics. Extraction and Purification of Enzymes: Extraction of enzymes: Extraction of soluble enzymes and membrane-bound enzymes, nature of extraction medium and conditions of extraction. Purification of enzymes: preliminary and secondary purification procedures, degree of purification and criteria of purity of enzymes. Determination of molecular mass of enzymes.

MODULE 2: 10 Hours
Enzymatic Techniques: Principles of enzymatic analysis. End-point and kinetic methods, immunoassays, spectrophotometric, electrochemical and radiochemical. Test strips methods, automation in enzymatic analysis: fixed time, fixed and continuous concentration. Handling of enzymes and coenzymes. Applications of enzymes in medicine and diagnostic kits; therapeutic enzymes.

MODULE 3: 10 Hours
Industrial Applications of Enzyme Technology: Textile industry, detergents, pulp and paper, leather, wood, animal feed, food and dairy industry – amylases, proteases, lipases, pectinases. Immobilization of Enzymes: Introduction, immobilization techniques and carriers. Immobilization techniques for soluble and insoluble (bound) enzymes. Immobilization of cells and organelles. Activity and kinetics of immobilized enzymes.

MODULE 4: 10 Hours
Immobilized Enzyme Reactors: Types of bioreactors: Batch stirred tank, plug-flow tubular, continuous stirred tank, fixed (packed) bed, fluidized bed and membrane. Applications Of Immobilized Enzymes: Enzyme sensors for clinical analysis, therapeutic medicine (intracorporeal and extracorporeal applications). Production of high-fructose corn syrup, L-aspartic acid, L- alanine and acrylamide.
Environmental applications. Economic aspects of immobilized enzymes, microorganisms, mammalian cells and plant cells. Safety aspects.

MODULE 5: 10 Hours
Enzyme Engineering: Glucose isomerase, subtilisin, redesigned lactate dehydrogenase. Synthetic enzymes- peroxidase. Catalytic antibodies.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, students are able to utilize the principles of enzyme purification and the product in various industries.

TEXT BOOKS:
1. Klaus Buchholz, Volker Kasche and Uwe Theo Bornscheuer. Biocatalisys and Enzyme Technology. 1st edn. Wiley-VCH, 2005.
2. Wolfgang Aehle. Enzymes in industry-production and applications. 3rd edn. Wiley-VCH, 2007.
3. Chaplin M.F. and C. Bucke. Enzyme Technology. CUP. Cambridge. 1990.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
4. Price N. C. and L Stevens. Fundaments of Enzymology: 3rd edn. Oxford University Press. 2003.
5. Trovor Palmer. Enzyme- Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Clinical chemistry. East West Press Pvt Ltd. 2004.
6. Bommanius A.S. and R. Riebel. Biocatalysis. Wiley-VCH. 2004
7. Octave Levenspiel. Chemical Reaction Engineering. 3rd Edition. John Wiley and Sons. 1999.

INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS
Subject Code : 14BBT152

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 50 Exam Marks : 100

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To familiarize with spectroscopic, chromatographic, electrophoretic and scattering methods and techniques of instrumentation
To understand the underlying principles for different instruments used in the laboratory.

MODULE 1 INTRODUCTION 10 Hours
Introduction to analytical methods, types of analytical methods, selection of analytical method (accuracy, precision, sensitivity, selectivity, scale, time and cost).
Measurement and error: Types of error, measurement of error and accuracy.
Electromagnetic radiation: Properties of electromagnetic radiation, interaction of radiation with matter, Born – Oppenheimer approximation.
Sources of radiation: Continuous sources of UV, visible and IR radiation (D2, Tungsten filament, Xenon arc lamps, Nernst glower, Globar sources).
Components of an analytical instrument, signal amplifiers (Transistors, Operational Amplifiers), noise, signal to noise ratio, sources of noise, signal to noise improvement.
Sampling: types of samples, sample preparation, sample size, sampling error, stock solutions, sample dilution.
Calibration methods: reagent blank, one point calibration, linear calibration, standard addition method, internal and external standard.

MODULE 2 ABSORPTION & EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY 10 Hours
Optical spectroscopy: Source, optical components, wavelength selector, sample holders, detectors. UV-Visible spectroscopy: Theory (Beer – Lambert’s law), chromophores and their characteristic absorption, instrumentation (single and double beam), qualitative and quantitative analysis, single and multiple component analysis, numericals.
Infrared spectroscopy: Theory, instrumentation, qualitative analysis, FT-IR. Atomic absorption spectroscopy: Theory, instrumentation and applications. Fluorescence and Phosphorescence spectroscopy: Theory, instrumentation and applications.

MODULE 3 RESONANCE & SCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY 10 Hours
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry: Theory, environmental effects on pNMR, chemical shift, applications of pNMR, data interpretation, MRI.
Molecular mass spectrometry: Theory, methods of ionization, mass analyzers, MALDI-TOF, and applications.
Raman spectroscopy: Origin of Raman spectra, theory, instrumentation and applications. Turbidimetry: Theory, instrumentation and applications.

MODULE 4 CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES 10 Hour
Introduction to chromatographic separations, classification. Basic principles and theory of chromatography. Gas chromatography and HPLC: principle, instrumentation, column, detector, mobile phase, sample preparation. Application of chromatographic techniques.

MODULE 5 ELECTROPHORETIC TECHINQUES 10 Hours
General principle, support media- Agarose gel, starch gel, agarose starch gel, polyacrylamide gel. Electrophoresis of protein: SDSPAGE, native gels, gradient gels, isoelectric focusing gels, 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, cellulose acetate electrophoresis.
Detection, estimation and recovery of proteins in gels. Electrophoresis of nucleic acids. Capillary electrophoresis.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course student will be able to correlate the applications of various instrumentation and analytical methods used in academia and industry.

TEXT BOOKS:
1. Willard and Merit, Instrumental Methods of Analysis, CSS Publishers, 1986.
2. Douglas A. Skoog, F. James Holler and Timothy A. Nieman, Principles of Instrumental analysis, Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
3. R.M. Silverstein and W.P. Webster, Spectrometric Identification of organic compounds, Wiley & Sons, 1999.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
4. Chatwal & Anand, Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis, Himalaya Publishing House.
5. K. Wilson and J. Walker, Principles and techniques of Practical biochemistry, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1994.
6. S. Ahuja & N. Jespersen, Modern Instrumental Analysis, Elsevier, 2006
7. B. Sivasankar, Instrumental methods of analysis, Oxford University Press, 2012

CONCEPTS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY
Subject Code : 14BBT12

IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 04 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 50 Exam Marks : 100

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To study cytology, physiology and genetics of the living organisms.
To cram microorganism, techniques and role in medicine, food, nutraceuticals and other allied industries.
To understand the basics of immune system and defence mechanism.
To comprehend about modern biotechnological techniques and their applications in broader domain.

MODULE 1: 10 HOURS
Introduction to Biology; Macromolecules; Carbon chemistry; Proteins: Structure, folding, catalysis; Nucleic acids: DNA & RNA; storage and transfer of genetic information; Lipids: membranes, structure & function; Carbohydrate chemistry, energy storage, building blocks.

MODULE 2: 10 HOURS
Cell Structure: Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic cells, plant and animal cells, structure of nucleus, mitochondria, ribosomes, Golgi bodies, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, chloroplast, vacuoles; Cell cycle and cell division: Different phases of cell cycle, cell division: Mitosis and meiosis.
Mendelian law of inheritance: Monohybrid and dihybrid inheritance, law of segregation and independent assortment; Gene Interaction; Multiple alleles, supplementary and complementary genes, epistasis. Identification of genetic material: classical experiments; chromosome structure and organization, chemical composition of chromatin, structural organization of nucleosomes, heterochromatin, polytene and lamp-brush chromosomes, human chromosomes, chromosomal disorders.

MODULE 3: 10 HOURS
Scope and History of microbiology, Introduction to the structure and functions of microorganism: Bacteria, Viruses, Fungi and Protozoan’s. Microscopy and microbial techniques: Study of microscopes; sterilization techniques: Heat, steam, Radiation, Filtration and chemical methods; Pure culture techniques: Serial Dilution, Streak, Spread, Pour Plate.
Immune System, Innate and adaptive immunity, antigens and antibodies; types of immune response, hypersensitivity. Humoral immunity: B-lymphocytes, Immunoglobulin classes, Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Cell mediated immunity. Thymus derived lymphocytes (T-cells), Antigen presenting cells (APC); Immunity to infection, Cytokines.

MODULE 4: 10 HOURS
Scope of agricultural biotechnology, Role of Micorbes in agriculture, Biopesticides, Bio fertilizers (Nitrogen fixing microbes), GM crops. Plant metabolic engineering and industrial products: Molecular farming for the production of industrial enzymes, biodegradable plastics, antibodies, edible vaccines. Metabolic engineering of plants for the production of fatty acids, industrial oils, flavonoids etc. Basic aspects of Food & Nutrition.

MODULE 5: 10 HOURS
Industrially important Microorganisms, Preservation techniques, Different media for fermentation, basic structure of fermentor and different types. Types of fermentation processes (surface, submerged, and solid state) and their products (ethanol, citric acid, lactic acid, enzymes, antibiotics)
Biological treatment of waste water, primary, secondary and tertiary treatments. Bio indicators, Bioremediation of xenobiotic compounds, Bioleaching of minerals from ores, Bio-sorption of toxic metals. Solid waste management. Biofuel production from agricultural wastes.

COURSE OUTCOMES:
After completion of the course, students will be aware of the cytology and physiology of living cell, Mendelism and interaction, tools and mechanism to understand microbe and their behavior along with immunology and application of biotechnology in food and other applied industries.

TEXT BOOKS
1. De Robertis EDP and De Robertis Jr. EMF, Cell and Molecular Biology, Wippincott Williams and Wiilkins publisher, 2001.
2. Strickburger M W, Principles of Genetics, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall Publication, India, 2011.
3. Prescott and Dunn, Industrial Microbiology, Macmillian, 1982
4. Ashim K Chakravarthy, Immunology & Immunotechnology, Oxford University Press, 2006.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Gardner, Simmonns and Snustad, Principles of Genetics, 8th edition, 2005
2. P S Verma, V R Agarwal, Cell Biology, Genetics, Evolution and Ecology, New Publisher Delhi, 2007.
3. K. Lindsey and M.G.K. Jones, Plant biotechnology in Agriculture, Prentice hall, New Jersey. 1989.
4. Munnecke DM, Johnson LM and others, Biodegradation and Detoxification of Environmental Pollutants CRC Press, 1982

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MOLECULR BIOLOGY LAB
Subject Code : 14BBT16

IA Marks : 25
No. of Practicals Hrs./ Week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Exam Marks : 50

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To provide hands on training with procedures for real time problems in chemical engineering and to teach molecular biology technique.

Lab Experiments
1. Calculation minimum settling velocity of cells.
2. Calculation of fluidizing velocity of immobilized enzyme system.
3. Rate of drying.
4. Extraction of antibiotics from different organic solvent and studying its efficiency of extraction.
5. Study of adsorption of proteins on matrix by different isotherms.
6. Study of mass transfer effect on reaction of immobilized enzymes.
7. Isolation of genomic DNA from Bacteria/ Plant/ Animal cells and its quantification
8. Study of Denaturation and Renaturation of DNA and Calculation of Tm value of DNA
9. Isolation of total RNA from E.coli
10. Preparation of Competent E coli cells and Transformation.
11. Isolation of Plasmid DNA and its purification
12. Restriction analysis and agarose electrophoresis of DNA

COURSE OUTCOMES:
At the end of the sessions the student will be able to perform experiments related to methods in chemical engineering and basic molecular biology techniques.

TEXT / REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Hans Peter Schmauder (Editor). Methods in Biotechnology Published by Taylor & Francis. 2004.
2. J. Sambrook and D.W. Russel; Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, Vols 1-3, CSHL, 2001.
3. Keith Wilson and John Walker, Pricniples and Techniques of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2000.

Leave a reply